NO GOOD DEED
Publisher : Mary McDonald
Description
In No Good Deed, photographer Mark Taylor finds himself in the incredulous position of being arrested as a homegrown terrorist and incarcerated at a secret location ... only he's not a terrorist, yet no one believes him. An unfortunate set of circumstances combined with a systematic campaign by the government to discredit him causes even those closest to Taylor to doubt his innocence. No one can defend a terrorist, and so he is left alone. His unyielding resolve to maintain his innocence tests his sanity, his belief in the people and the world he knows, as well as his very will to live.

The themes are very relevant, and could have been yanked right out of today's headlines: terrorists, controversial interrogation techniques, and the rights (or lack thereof) of detainees. But what if they're not guilty? No Good Deed explores that question in a riveting, page turning way.

Priced at $2.99


The Story Behind This Book
This book started as a short story based on a writing challenge. The challenge was to have your character wake up in a padded room and not know how they got there. The challenge was issued around the same time as the headlines were debating the treatment of American enemy combatants. Not the prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay. but American citizens who were designated enemy combatants. I wondered what would happen if an innocent man was accused? I've always been a fan of the reluctant hero and time travel fiction, and while this isn't exactly time travel, there is a fantastical element to the story. The short story morphed into a novel because readers of the story wanted to know what happened to the character. The padded room has been replaced by a cell and the character knows how he got there, but he's still confused as to exactly why and how he can explain.


Praise and Reviews
I thoroughly enjoyed reading No Good Deed. The first five chapters were consumed in the blink of an eye. I didn't want to put the book down. 

The themes are very relevant, and could have been yanked right out of today's headlines: terrorists, controversial interrogation techniques, and the rights (or lack thereof) of detainees. I always just kind of assumed detainees were legitimate bad guys who had it coming. But what if they're not? No Good Deed explores that question in a riveting, page turning way. 

Not my usual genre, but I'm glad I read it!

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Mary McDonald
When I'm not writing, I'm a respiratory therapist. I've been married 25 years and have three children.